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overview

The Chicago Mercantile Exchange is an international marketplace enabling institutions and businesses to manage their financial risks and allocate their assets. On its trading floors, buyers and sellers meet to trade futures contracts and options on futures through the process of open outcry. The Merc's diverse product line consists of futures and options on futures within four general categories: agricultural commodities, foreign currencies, interest rates and stock indexes.

Advisory

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
Jeremy Larsen
Alaron Trading

Pit Trading vs. Phone Trading
Floor Experience a plus
Getting a feeling for the market

COMMODITY ANALYST
Tim Hannigan
Alaron Trading

Getting started in commodities
Trusting your instincts
Reacting to market swings

OPTIONS TRADER
Al Gould
Independent Scalper

Obtaining a floor member seat
Playing the mental game
Floor Trading is WAR

RUNNER
Paul Scorshop
Linco Corp.

Trading Floor Culture
Schmoozing the Boss
How to get started

PHONE CLERK
Mike Clokowsky
Linco Corp.

Open outcry vs. Electronic Trading
 
Stepping up to the plate
Trading skills to pay the bills

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Members of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange include the world's largest banks and investment houses, as well as independent traders and brokers. All over the world, pension fund and investment advisers, portfolio managers, corporate treasurers and commercial banks trade on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange as an integral part of their financial management strategy. In fact, when business, industry and commerce make effective use of futures markets, they help reduce the risks that are part of doing business which means lower prices for consumers.

overview reprinted from the official site for the MERC-- www.cme.com